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OUZO PLOMARI

Plomari is famous world wide for it’s production of ouzo. The ouzo of Plomari is traditionally known as the best ouzo in Greece. Right now in Plomari there are four companies which make ouzo the traditional way. These are: Arvaniti, Barbayanni, Giannatsi and Pitsiladi. The ouzo Arvaniti and Barbayanni are the most well known ouzo companies world wide. The Barbayanni company is also well known for it’s museum of ouzo which is situated near Agios Isidoros in Plomari, where thousands of visitors come every year. It is also the most significant attraction of Plomari.

Plomari is famous world wide for it’s production of ouzo. The ouzo of Plomari is traditionally known as the best ouzo in Greece. Right now in Plomari there are four companies which make ouzo the traditional way. These are: Arvaniti, Barbayanni, Giannatsi and Pitsiladi. The ouzo Arvaniti and Barbayanni are the most well known ouzo companies world wide. The Barbayanni company is also well known for it’s museum of ouzo which is situated near Agios Isidoros in Plomari, where thousands of visitors come every year. It is also the most significant attraction of Plomari.

How ouzo is made
Ouzo starts by distilling 96 percent alcohol by volume (ABV) pure ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin (or 96 percent pure ethyl alcohol in which 0.05 percent natural anethole has been added) in copper stills together with anise and optionally other flavorings, such as star anise, coriander, cloves, and cinnamon. The product is a flavored alcoholic solution known as flavored ethyl alcohol or, more commonly as ouzo yeast—μαγιά ούζου in Greek—a misnomer, as no fermentation has taken or will take place. Ouzo yeast is then usually mixed with 96 percent pure ethyl alcohol (the Greek law dictates that at least 20 percent of total final alcohol must originate from ouzo yeast), and finally sugar may be added and the mix is diluted with water (final ABV must be at least 37.5 percent), usually around 40 percent ABV. Some producers such as Varvayiannis, Babatzim (ouzo classic) and Pitsiladis do not add any further ethyl alcohol—they simply dilute ouzo yeast with water (and add sugar if needed). This type of ouzo is the highest quality and often of the highest price as well. Ouzo production doesn't include any fermentation or multiple distillations, which is the case for tsipouro.

Aperitif drink
In modern Greece, ouzeries (the suffix -erie is imported from French) can be found in nearly all cities, towns, and villages. These cafe-like establishments serve ouzo with mezedes — appetizers such as octopus, salad, sardines, calamari, fried zucchini, and clams, among others. It is traditionally slowly sipped (usually mixed with water or ice) together with mezedes shared with others over a period of several hours in the early evening.

In other countries it is tradition to have ouzo in authentic Greek restaurants as an aperitif, served in a shot glass and deeply chilled before the meal is started. No water or ice is added but the drink is served very cold, enough to make some crystals form in the drink as it is served.

Appearance
When water or ice is added to ouzo, which is clear in color, it turns milky white; this is because anethole, the essential oil of anise, is soluble in alcohol but not in water. Diluting the spirit causes it to separate creating an emulsion, whose fine droplets scatter the light. This process is called louching, and is also found while preparing absinthe.

More in this category: « TSIPOURO KITRO NAXOU »